Beauly Priory Ruins

Beauly, United Kingdom

Beauly Priory was a Valliscaulian monastic community. It was probably founded in 1230. It is not known for certain who the founder was, different sources giving Alexander II of Scotland, John Byset, and both. The French monks, along with Bisset (a nearby, recently settled landowner), had a strong enough French-speaking presence to give the location and the river the name beau lieu ('beautiful place') and have it pass into English. It is not the best documented abbey, and few of the priors of Beauly are known by name until the 14th century. It became Cistercian on April 16, 1510, after the suppression of the Valliscaulian Order by the Pope. The priory was gradually secularized, and ruled by a series of commendators. The priory's lands were given over to the bishop of Ross by royal charter on October 20, 1634. The ruins today are still extensive and are one of the main visitor attractions in Inverness-shire.

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Founded: 1230
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Denise Cox (6 months ago)
A very pretty village that is well looked after. Great to visit for an hour to look around the priory, along the main street and to drop into an award winning bakers for a bite to eat.
Amy Muir (6 months ago)
Lovely sandstone ruined Priory. Really well cared and in good condition.
Craig McCutcheon (6 months ago)
Interesting ruin, where you can imagine how grand it once was in it's day.
Joanna P (7 months ago)
Lovely surprise to find an old priory to visit in Beauly. It was interesting to imagine what life was like there. Helped by very good information boards. Worth a visit if you are in the town.
Ayhan Mimtas (7 months ago)
Beauly (beautiful place) is certainly a nice village to see. Its residents are quiet friendly. Like all Priories the Beauly Priory seems to be reflecting both the beauty and the sadness of life. It has a beautiful old tree standing on entrance, it was even a runner up in 2017 as the most beautiful tree of Scotland. Which we didn't know before admiring it. The priory is peaceful but sad yet still very picturesque!!!
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