Kortrijk Belfry

Kortrijk, Belgium

The belfry (Belfort) of Kortrijk stands in the centre of the Grote Markt and was part of the former cloth hall. The earliest mention of the cloth hall dates back to 1248. The belfry is an imposing square tower, slightly sunk into the market square. This is due to the market being raised throughout the centuries. The view from the tower was mainly determined in 1520 with the reconstruction of the upper section of the tower and in 1899 with the demolition of the surrounding buildings. The spire features a gilded statue of Mercury (the god of trade) from 1712, and Manten and Kalle, the two figures that strike the hour, adorn the front. On the southeastern side you will find the war memorial to commemorate the First World War, unveiled on 15 July 1923.

Kortrijk belfry is one of belfries in Belgium and France listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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www.toerismekortrijk.be

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Angie BB (2 years ago)
Very interesting Belfry that amazingly survived a WWII bombing
Te Ratahi Cross (2 years ago)
Fantastic fòod great service. Awesome beer selection
Elia Viaene (2 years ago)
I like this old tower with great historical value. Great location and lots to do in the area too
Alex Kluev (2 years ago)
Good, considered its age
Wouter Koster (2 years ago)
Verry nice city but difficult to enter with car.
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