Kortrijk Belfry

Kortrijk, Belgium

The belfry (Belfort) of Kortrijk stands in the centre of the Grote Markt and was part of the former cloth hall. The earliest mention of the cloth hall dates back to 1248. The belfry is an imposing square tower, slightly sunk into the market square. This is due to the market being raised throughout the centuries. The view from the tower was mainly determined in 1520 with the reconstruction of the upper section of the tower and in 1899 with the demolition of the surrounding buildings. The spire features a gilded statue of Mercury (the god of trade) from 1712, and Manten and Kalle, the two figures that strike the hour, adorn the front. On the southeastern side you will find the war memorial to commemorate the First World War, unveiled on 15 July 1923.

Kortrijk belfry is one of belfries in Belgium and France listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Details

Founded: 1520
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Belgium

More Information

www.toerismekortrijk.be

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Howard jones (3 years ago)
If its closed, and it mostley is, then its just a weird tower. That makes noise.
Moustafa Kassem (3 years ago)
It's really nice place to visit. It's surround by restaurants and coffee shops. And you have the shopping street next to you.
wim vlaeyen (3 years ago)
Nice surrounding, just sit down and enjoy a Belgian beer and listen to the " beiaard "
Angie BB (5 years ago)
Very interesting Belfry that amazingly survived a WWII bombing
Te Ratahi Cross (5 years ago)
Fantastic fòod great service. Awesome beer selection
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