Church of Our Lady

Kortrijk, Belgium

Construction work on the Church of Our Lady (Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekerk) began in 1199 on the initiative of Count Baldwin IX. The church was located on the estate of Kortrijk that was fortified and completely walled in, with the exception of an area on the Leie. Of this early Gothic church only the west facade, the nave and the transept remain. The towers were constructed at the end of the 13th century. After the Battle of Westrozebeke in 1382 the church was largely destroyed and rebuilt. At a later stage the interior was decorated in Baroque style.

Following the Battle of the Golden Spurs in 1302, which took place on the nearby Groeninge field, the Flemish hung five hundred golden spurs from French knights who had been slain in the choir in thanks to Our Lady of Groeninge. In 1382, Breton mercenaries took them together with other valuables following the Battle of Westrozebeke. The spurs were later replaced by copies that still hang in the church. The Church of Our Lady conceals a number of art treasures such as the 'Erection of the cross' by Anthony Van Dyck.

In 1370, Count Lodewijk van Male constructed the Counts' chapel as a mausoleum for himself. In the chapel you can admire the stunning wall paintings of the counts of Flanders and the statue of the Holy Catharina (a famous masterpiece). The stained glass windows accentuate the church's noble character: the counts of Flanders, knights in armour during the Battle of the Golden Spurs etc.

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Details

Founded: 1199
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Miguel Roldán Dulcey (20 months ago)
Hermosa iglesia. Buen lugar de recogimiento y contemplación.
Jan Torfs (20 months ago)
Prachtige kerk in Gotische stijl. Werd gebouwd in 1199 en is daarmee één van de oudste gebouwen van deze stad. De kerk maakte vroeger deel uit van het Grafelijke Domein en is nu een beschermd monument. Bij een bezoek , kijk naar de schilderijen van Van Dyck en let aan de buitenkant op de waterspuwers aan de gevel.
Marie Jeanne De Clercq (21 months ago)
Mooie architectuur.. oud sfeervol gebouw “ klasse”
Marcellino Buyck (2 years ago)
Echt prachtig mooi van binnen
Michel Noterman (2 years ago)
Hoofdkerk kortrijk samen met de Sint Maartenskerk.
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