Bossenstein Castle

Ranst, Belgium

The oldest part of the present Bossenstein Castle is the square keep, probably built before the 14th century by a Joannes van Busco or Van den Bossche. Not much later it went to the Van Berchem family. They are supposed to have made some major alterations to the castle. They sold it in 1544 to Guilelmus van der Rijt, who was a member of the city council of nearby Antwerp. In the deed of sale the castle was described as an impressive estate, with a lot of outbuildings. Of these outbuildings nothing survives.

In 1655 it was sold again, this time to Willem van Halmale. He rebuilt the castle into a beautiful residence, which was still fortified. During the 18th century the castle changed hands several times between several noble families. Between 1798 and 1843 the castle was used by religious institutions. In 1906 the castle underwent restoration works, saving it from slow decay.

At present the castle is surrounded by the grounds of an 18-hole golf and polo club. The terrain of this club is probably not freely accessible. There is however a long distance walking path leading through the golf course which is. As far as I know the castle itself can not be visited.

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Address

Bistweg 14-36, Ranst, Belgium
See all sites in Ranst

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carl Bux (7 months ago)
Mooi golfterrein.
Bert Brugghemans (9 months ago)
Eric Blom (9 months ago)
Wandelgebied rond kasteel Bossenstein. Omsloten door golfterrein.
Frank Mangelschots (11 months ago)
Hier zijn we rond gewandeld tijdens een partijtje golf. Zag er wel mooi uit.
Alissa Harp (11 months ago)
This castle is from my family history.
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