The Haus am Horn was built for the Weimar Bauhaus's exhibition of July through September 1923. It was designed by Georg Muche, a painter and a teacher at the Bauhaus. Other Bauhaus instructors, such as Adolf Meyer and Walter Gropius, assisted with the technical aspects of the house's design. The house's construction was financed by Sommerfeld, a Berlin lumber merchant, who had been a client of Gropius years before. The house was built away from the main section of the Bauhaus, on land that was being used as a vegetable garden for the school. The site is currently near the Park an der Ilm in Weimar, on a residential street.

It was a simple cubic design, utilizing steel and concrete in its construction. At the center of the house was a clerestory-lit living room, twenty-feet square, with specialized rooms surrounding it. Each room had specially-designed furnishings and hardware designed by and created in the Bauhaus workshops. László Moholy-Nagy, for instance, designed the lights and were made in the metal workshop; Marcel Breuer, a student at the time, designed the furniture, including the built-in cabinetry.

Owing to the Bauhaus's financial difficulties, the Haus am Horn was sold to a private individual in 1924. In 1996, it entered onto the monument preservation list of UNESCO along with other important Bauhaus sites in both Weimar and Dessau. In 1998-1999, the structure was evaluated for restoration by the Bauhaus University Circle of Friends.

On the occasion of the Bauhaus‘s 80th anniversary, the house was completely restored by the Bauhaus University Circle of Friends with support from the Sparkasse Finance Group and several public donors.

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Am Horn 61, Weimar, Germany
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Founded: 1923
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Historical period: Weimar Republic (Germany)

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