Schäftlarn Abbey

Schäftlarn, Germany

Schäftlarn Abbey was founded in 762 by Waltrich, a Benedictine monk of noble family, on his own land. During the next two centuries the monastery grew as a result of various gifts and endowments (among them the estates of Schwabing and Hesselohe). From 1140 to its dissolution during the secularisation of Bavaria in 1803, Schäftlarn belonged to the Premonstratensian Order.

In 1866 King Ludwig I of Bavaria restored possession to the Benedictines, who set up a secondary school here. The school did close between 1941 and 1945 by the National Socialists. Immediately after the war the school, which is private, was re-opened.

The present abbey buildings were constructed in 1707 to plans by Giovanni Antonio Viscardi. The church of Saint Denis, built as the abbey church, is a beautiful example of the Rococo architectural style. It was begun as a new building from 1733 to 1740 under Francois de Cuvilliés the Elder, and finished during the period from 1751 to 1760 by Johann Georg Gunetzrhainer and Johann Michael Fischer. From 1754 to 1756 the church was painted and decorated with stucco by Johann Baptist Zimmermann. From 1756 to 1764 Johann Baptist Straub worked on the altars and the chancel. There is also a formal garden here, recently restored.

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Details

Founded: 762 AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Part of The Frankish Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vasil Shomov (2 years ago)
Super
Kugel Ball (2 years ago)
Very nice place.
boris zbicki (2 years ago)
Performances are first class
Jeremiah Victory (2 years ago)
Nice place
Daniel Quabis (2 years ago)
Part of the Camino. Really worth to see.
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