Igreja de Santo António (Saint Anthony Church)

Lisbon, Portugal

This is the Church of Santo Antonio, or Saint Anthony of Padua (Italy). Despite his name, the saint was born in Lisbon 1195 in what is now the crypt of this church. The site of the family house where Anthony was born was turned into a small chapel in the 15th century. This early building, from which nothing remains, was rebuilt in the early 16th century, during the reign of King Manuel I.

After long missionary pursuits, he settled in Padua (hence, his name). Due to his immense popularity, he was canonized less than a year after his death, in 1232.

St Vincent might be the official patron saint of the city but Anthony dwells in the hearts of all the people of Lisbon. He is the patron saint of lost things and he is also known as the matchmaker saint. On Saint Anthony's Day in June, mass weddings take place in the city's cathedral.

On May 12th 1982, Pope John Paul II visited the church and prayed in the crypt, which marks the spot where the saint was born.

Next to the church is a small museum about the life of the saint.

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Details

Founded: 1730
Category: Religious sites in Portugal

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Benison Michael (7 months ago)
The Church of Saint Anthony of Lisbon (Portuguese: Igreja de Santo António de Lisboa) is a Roman Catholic church located in Lisbon, Portugal. It is dedicated to Saint Anthony of Lisbon (also known in the Christian world as Saint Anthony of Padua). According to tradition, the church was built on the site where the saint was born, in 1195. The church is classified as a National Monument.
Rafał Garus (7 months ago)
Very amazing and beautiful place
Rafał Garus (7 months ago)
Very amazing and beautiful place??
Yvonne Riester (11 months ago)
Nice cool church to sit and rest a bit.
Yvonne Riester (11 months ago)
Nice cool church to sit and rest a bit.
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