Convento da Graça (Graça Convent)

Lisbon, Portugal

Graça Convent is one of the oldest convents in Lisbon. According the legend, in 1362 the statue of Our Lady of Grace appeared in the network of a fisherman. The convent part is nowadays used by the army and is not open for visits, but the church is still in use.

Most of the original Graça Church collapsed in the earthquake of 1755, so what you see today is an 18th century baroque monument. Inside it is partly decorated in 16th and 17th century tiles, while outside is Sophia de Mello Belvedere (famous Portuguese poet ) which is one of the city's most popular viewpoints.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Portugal

More Information

pt.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mahbub Miah (2 years ago)
Good luck
Guilherme Nickel (2 years ago)
Nice church to visit. Great view over Lisbon, and great place to go during those hot days of summer, since the church is kind of cold
Aluhe Xavier (2 years ago)
Beautiful church...with an amazing sightseeing point over the historical center of Lisbon and the Castel of Saint Jorge. A coffee with some table... Nice to enjoy with the sunset...
Parvat Karki (2 years ago)
Nice view
Simon D (3 years ago)
Nice convent with cloister. Only a small portion of the building has been reopened after extensive renovation following the early 19th century shutdown. The gardens are still in their unkept form, but the overall contrast and architecture is very pleasing. Church is quite impressive. Don’t miss JC in his own little alcove, at the front to the right.
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