Convento da Graça (Graça Convent)

Lisbon, Portugal

Graça Convent is one of the oldest convents in Lisbon. According the legend, in 1362 the statue of Our Lady of Grace appeared in the network of a fisherman. The convent part is nowadays used by the army and is not open for visits, but the church is still in use.

Most of the original Graça Church collapsed in the earthquake of 1755, so what you see today is an 18th century baroque monument. Inside it is partly decorated in 16th and 17th century tiles, while outside is Sophia de Mello Belvedere (famous Portuguese poet ) which is one of the city's most popular viewpoints.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Portugal

More Information

pt.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Daniel Haman (8 months ago)
Very nice church! If possible, visit monastery as well.
Tanios Hokayem (8 months ago)
A peaceful peace of Art. A great church.
Goncalo Lousa (9 months ago)
Gorgeous church in a very pretty area
Vinçenc Palushaj (13 months ago)
Beautiful church Make sure you see the monastery too (no entry fee) and go down the steps if you want to see some wonderful street art.
Tugce C (2 years ago)
This place is a hidden treasure. Church and monastery is free to visit. I really loved ceramic tiles. There is a cafe in front of the monastery. It is hilarious. Not too many people are interested in the monastery. That's pity. You can donate for maintenance. Do not miss the view of course.
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