Fourvière Roman Theatre

Lyon, France

The Roman theatre is a Roman ancient structure in Lyon built on the hill of Fourvière, which is located in the center of the Roman city.

The theatre was built in two steps: around 15 BC, a theatre with a 90 m diameter was built next to the hill. At the beginning of the 2nd century, the final construction added a last place for the audience. The diameter is 108 m, and there were seats for 10,000 people.

Having been well restored in the early twentieth century, the Grand Roman Theatre of Lyon is one of the oldest structures of its kind and a reminder of Lugdunum, the Gallo-Roman city which would become Lyon. The site was generally abandoned by the third century AD.

Behind the theatre are further ruins, possibly the remains of the Temple of Cybele. The Grand Roman Theatre of Lyon is now used for performances. It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage site of Lyon.

Nowadays, the theatre is primarily a tourist site, but it is still used as a cultural venue. Each year, the Nuits de Fourvière festival takes place in the theatre.

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Details

Founded: 15 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ricardo Cantu (12 months ago)
Excellent Roman amphitheater that is well preserved. Nice on a sunny day to walk around and absorb all of its ancient history. A must visit when in Lyon, France.
Tomáš Prošek (13 months ago)
A fascinating place! Visiting it in January, we were there almost alone, wandering freely around the large area. A great experience, also because of nice view of Lyon downtown.
Gabriel McCarthy (2 years ago)
ah the theatre! As ancient as it is necessary for the persistence of the human existence for understanding the metaphysical world and depth of human understanding. This place is dope! I would love to perform here and would hope that I can one of these days!
stephane lepain (2 years ago)
Pretty cool. If you have some spare time in Lyon, just pop in and you will be nicely surprised. Plus the view is phenomenal. Go there on a clear day though.
Timothy Wall (2 years ago)
So fascinating to see such ancient items! Even mundane things like old bottles and pottery are amazing when they are 2000 years old. The museum is well organized and spacious. The little audio guide device them let you use was a nice touch. For 4 euros, you can't beat the price, if you have even a passing interest in Roman/French/Celtic/European history.
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