Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Washington, D.C., United States

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial is a 2-acre (8,000 m²) national memorial in Washington, DC. It honors U.S. service members of the U.S. armed forces who fought in the Vietnam War, service members who died in service in Vietnam/South East Asia, and those service members who were unaccounted for during the War.

Its construction and related issues have been the source of controversies, some of which have resulted in additions to the memorial complex. The memorial currently consists of three separate parts: the Three Servicemen Memorial, the Vietnam Women's Memorial, and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall, which is the best-known part of the memorial.

The main part of the memorial was completed in 1982. The memorial is maintained by the U.S. National Park Service, and receives around 3 million visitors each year.

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Founded: 1982
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Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

D Patterson (5 months ago)
Very humbling place. Sacred ground for those who have went on bravely before us, that gave their all so others will live free. Forever we are in debt to you. Untill Valhalla....
Henry Nalence (6 months ago)
Very detailed and it was nice that there were veterans shading over named with a paper and pencil.
joek2k (6 months ago)
What a heart-breaking memorial dedicated to our fallen Vietnam war heroes. Seeing all the names on the wall makes you feel appreciative of the sacrifices our fellow Americans had to endure for our freedom. My grandpa's best friend died in the Vietnam war from a north Vietnamese sniper when he was just 20 years old. When I was there, I etched his name on a piece of paper and handed it to my grandpa for something he can hold onto and remember him for. There are nearby small park benches if you don't want to visit the wall and just standby and the memorial is always clean.
Jordan Gensemer (6 months ago)
I think this is a really touching place to go and to see all the names of those people that were lost in the war. I think that the area around was very nice as well. Could've used a little TLC but for the most part really nice.
BradJill Travels (13 months ago)
Another touching monument along The Mall is that of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. During my last visit in May 2016, I enjoyed seeing the monument in front of the row of trees flush with green, a benefit of visiting during the warmer months of the year. This is a good time of year to take photographs of this particular monument. I've always been impressed with the simplicity of this monument, being two walls set at an angle cut into the ground. It is a respectable yet haunting design and leaves you with deep impressions, regardless if you know veterans or victims of this most tragic war. In addition to seeing the list of soldiers killed in battle during the Vietnam War engraved along this monument walls, there is also a statue of three soldiers in combat gear that you can see nearby. This is worth seeing. Also worth taking time to visit is the Vietnam Women's Memorial, which commemorates the 265,000 woman that served during that period. This monument is just a couple minutes walk east. Note: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial can be quite crowded due to its importance as well as it proximity to other famous and popular memorials nearby. If you want unobstructed photographs or more peaceful, quiet visits, it is best to visit very early in the morning, just after daybreak. At this time, you can view prior to the large crowds arriving.
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