The National Theatre is located in Washington, D.C., and is a venue for a variety of live stage productions with seating for 1,676. Despite its name, it is not a governmentally funded national theatre, but operated by a private, non-profit organization.

This historic playhouse was founded on December 7, 1835, by William Corcoran and other prominent citizens who wanted the national capital to have a first-rate theatre. The theatre's initial production was Man of the World. The theatre has been in almost continuous operation since, at the same Pennsylvania Avenue location a few blocks from the White House. The structure has been rebuilt several times, including partial reconstructions after five fires in the 19th century. The current building, at 1321 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, was constructed in 1923, opening in September of that year.

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    Founded: 1835/1923
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    4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    F. Robert Ries (48 days ago)
    Throwback feel to it and seems just a tinge worn down - or maybe "unkempt" is the better word. For example, the awning that extends from the balcony to keep us heathens from pouring our drinks onto the spectators seated below was quite dusty. But it's a great space and our seats in the balcony were fantastic.
    Patrick Balchunas (2 months ago)
    A hidden jewel. Parking is very easy. Its easy to get to from the VIRGINIA suburbs and matinee ticket prices are awesome. I love this theater. Its a much more fun and pleasurable experience than that other place on the Potomac River
    Nicky Coogan (2 months ago)
    This was our first experience at the National theater. I loved the more intimate feel if this theater. I was really surprised at how good our seats were and how close to the stage we were. I will definitely go to another show in this theater. The drink and concessions were very pricey, but the theater as a whole was great!
    Erin Lyle (3 months ago)
    We saw the show, Beautiful, @ National Theatre. Its not the first time I've been there nor will it be the last! I highly recommend the show! Beautiful was incredible!! There are no words to describe it. Beautiful is a must see!! The Theatre itself is wonderful. Although, beware, there is a section in the Orchestra section that evens out for 3-4 rows. You either want to so I front or behind those rows for better viewing comfort.
    C DJ (4 months ago)
    Watched Beautiful, the Carole King musical. Sound in the theater is good. The ushers did a great job seating people. There were also ushers in the ladies room who directed patrons to empty stalls. While there was a line (isn't there always) it moved fast because of the ushers.
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