Thomas Jefferson Memorial

Washington, D.C., United States

The Thomas Jefferson Memorial is a presidential memorial dedicated to Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), one of the most important of the American Founding persons. Jefferson was the main drafter and writer of the Declaration of Independence, member of the Continental Congress, governor of the newly independent Commonwealth of Virginia, American minister to King Louis XVI and the Kingdom of France, first U.S. Secretary of State under the first President George Washington, the second Vice President of the United States, and also the third President (1801–1809).

The neoclassical Memorial building on the Tidal Basin off the Washington Channel of the Potomac River was designed by the architect John Russell Pope and built by the Philadelphia contractor John McShain. Construction of the building began in 1939 and was completed in 1943. The bronze statue of Jefferson was added in 1947.

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Founded: 1939-1943
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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thicc Daddy (14 months ago)
This is a nice memorial. I went here while I was in DC and was satisfied with my experience. I walked up to this memorial and went inside. The memorial is built so that there’s a statue of Thomas Jefferson standing inside a large, white dome with columns, letting light flow into the interior. I walked around the memorial and looked at the statue of Thomas Jefferson, which looked pretty good. After walked around int the memorial, I left, satisfied with my experience. I gave this memorial five stars because it looks very nice and does a good job of memorializing Thomas Jefferson.
Ryan (2 years ago)
Very far out of the way but worth the walk/ride. I would highly suggest rent a bike or scooter to go across the basin if you are visiting the National Mall. Beware that some scooters go out of network and can stop working (which happened to us). The monument is undergoing repairs but it is still accessible and beautiful on the inside. The outside also gives a nice moments for reflection while looking out over the beautiful Basin! Highly recommend going to this monument over many of the others.
Sharon Dell (2 years ago)
One of my favorite places to see in DC, it has a beautiful view of the Washington Monument and the White House. Gorgeous at sunset as it's set a ways back from the trees near the National Mall. I love the beautiful architecture, history presentation, convenient restrooms, and the variety in the gifts shops in the interior.
Robert Hobbs (2 years ago)
The Jefferson Memorial, an anchor to the National Mall sitting South of the White House and Washington Monument sits on the edge of The Potomac. This memorial is always the first of my day, standing somewhat by itself, fitted with Jefferson in the center, and articles of the declaration etched in the surrounding walls, its a perfect memorial to honor both Jefferson, the most notable author of the declaration of independence, and our other founding fathers. The views from here are spectacular, highly recommend starting here and walkng to the rest of the national mall for some awesome scenery. It is especially nice in spring at the time of the cherry blossoms, which lines the tidal basin that host this great memorial.
Robert Knox (2 years ago)
Don't forget the museum below with the gift shop
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