The Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington D.C., most commonly known as St. Matthew's Cathedral, is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Washington.

St. Matthew's is dedicated to the Apostle Matthew, who among other things is patron saint of civil servants, having himself been a tax collector. It was established in 1840. Originally located at 15th and H Streets, construction of the current church began in 1893, with the first Mass being celebrated June 2, 1895. Construction continued until 1913 when the church was dedicated. In 1939, it became the cathedral for the newly established Archdiocese of Washington.

The structure is constructed of red brick with sandstone and terra cotta trim in the Romanesque Revival style with Byzantine elements. Designed by architect C. Grant La Farge, it is in the shape of a Latin cross measuring 47 m × 41 m and seats about 1,200 persons. The interior is richly decorated in marble and semiprecious stones, notably a 11 m mosaic of Matthew behind the main altar by Edwin Blashfield. The cathedral is capped by an octagonal dome that extends above the nave and is capped by a cupola and crucifix that brings the total height 61 m.

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Founded: 1893-1913
Category: Religious sites in United States

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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Edward Sinisgalli (2 years ago)
Beautiful catholic cathedral where JFK'S funeral mass took place
Marjorie Thomas (2 years ago)
It is a beautiful Cathedral to visit, and for worshipping. I recommend it. The only thing is that it is hard to find street parking. The best way is public transportation.
Vivian Clark (2 years ago)
This is an excellent place to worship or just tour. Monsignor Jameson, the priests, and staff are top rate. The choir sings with angelic voices. Whether or not you are interested in worshipping, it is worth touring for it's historical significance and adoring it's magnificent pipe organ, Italian marble, and artistic tile work.
Edith Chester (2 years ago)
A sunny day at St. Matthew's Cathedral, a renown Cathedral in Washington, DC, and surrounding areas of M & 17th St NW. 1/6/19
Larry Cirignano (3 years ago)
Sacred space. The Mother Teresa statue is worth seeing
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