Aywiers Abbey Ruins

Lasne, Belgium

Aywiers Abbey was founded in 1215 by Cistercian monks. It prospered and grew thanks to donations up to 2000 hectares. During the the French Revolution the abbey will be sold and the new owner demolished it partly. Today the seven-hectare garden is surrounded by ancient walls, containing superb hundred-year-old tree specimens, shrubs and rare plants, a pond and springs as well as a garden of aromatic and medicinal plant.

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Address

Rue de l'Abbaye, Lasne, Belgium
See all sites in Lasne

Details

Founded: 1215
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

www.aywiers.be

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bernadette Hellemans (2 years ago)
2x per jaar een vrij uitgebreide tuinbeurs.
Valérie Lefèvre (2 years ago)
Toujours un plaisir de participer à ce bel événement automnal.
Géraldine Marino (2 years ago)
Toujours très agréable et intéressant. Pour les amoureux des jardins et des plantes. Rendez-vous incontournable, deux fois par an
Michel Duquet (2 years ago)
Endroit incontournable mais c est le Brabant wallon les plantes très cher par rapport au hainaut
Anne-Marie PHILIPPOT (2 years ago)
Très agréable, stands de qualité, bel environnement. ... pressée d'y retourner
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