Temple du Change

Lyon, France

The Temple du Change or Loge du Change, formerly used for the stock exchange of Lyon, was originally built after plans by architect Simon Gourdet between 1631 and 1653. It was then rebuilt under the direction of Jacques-Germain Soufflot in 1748-1750. It has been assigned to Protestant worship since 1803, hence its designation Temple.

The first Loge du Change was a small classical building with four arches in front and two on each side. It soon became insufficient for Lyon's money exchange, but was not renovated before 1748.

Soufflot provided plans and elevations for its repair, performed by Jean-Baptiste Roche, an architect he had himself introduced. The flanking terraced houses were torn down, which provided the opportunity to significantly enlarge the building, which has a fifth arch in front, providing, instead of a central pier, a central bay as classical usage demands. Behind the façade rises a large room, as high and wide as the building. It is rectangular with an imperial-styled roof supported on four massive pillars. The first-floor facade was completely rebuilt in Soufflot's uncompromising neoclassical style, unusual for the epoch.

During the French Revolution, the building was abandoned. It became an inn for a moment, before being assigned to the Protestants in 1803. Minor changes were made throughout the nineteenth century, particularly on the interior and the furnishings.

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    Rue de la Loge 2, Lyon, France
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    Founded: 1631/1748
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    David Malleval (13 months ago)
    This building is a reformed Protestant church, it was at the time a former stock exchange establishment: the Loge du Change.
    fred guillerme (15 months ago)
    Niquel
    Brayden Wolfe (18 months ago)
    buy bought
    Gerard Moloney (19 months ago)
    Picturesque Square
    joli joli (2 years ago)
    Not bad...
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