Saint-Bonaventure Church

Lyon, France

The Saint-Bonaventure church's history is intimately related to the convent of the Cordeliers whose it was a part. It was built originally in the 13th century. The current church was built in just two years between 1325 and 1327. It housed the remains of Jacques de Grolée, died on 4 May 1327, which is under the high altar, before being moved somewhere near the epistle in 1599. The church was consecrated on 18 September 1328 by the archbishop of Lyon, Pierre IV of Savoy, under the name of St. Francis of Assisi. The church was expanded from 1471 to 1484 and was then named Saint-Bonaventure.

The choir was restored in 1607. It served as a granary grain after the French Revolution before being used to worship in 1806 to getting its current facade under the Cardinal Joseph Fesch's leadership.

Around 1890, the church was cleared of the curia and buildings bordering it on its side, which allowed the expansion of the rue Grolée on its western flank.

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Address

Rue Grolée 3304, Lyon, France
See all sites in Lyon

Details

Founded: 1325-1327
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

rivard marie (11 months ago)
APPEL AUX CATHOLIQUES DE FRANCE Il n'a pas été abordé le problème du pouvoir d'achat et les mots travail et économies sont des gros mots Synthèse de la réunion qui ne correspondait nullement aux propositions des catholiques présent malhonnêté intellectuelle Petite ou grande trahison ?!!!……. . Choquant pour des éclésiastiques
Arnaud Echavidre (12 months ago)
Was a great concert out there
John Dove (2 years ago)
Nice
David Kenny (2 years ago)
What an amazing interior, the church is lined with majestic stained glass windows. Was fortunate to visit as the Sun shone through with cornucopia of colour.
Carlos Schaap (2 years ago)
2 times this week for a closed door. When the paper on the door said it's open........
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