Saint-Nizier Church

Lyon, France

The Church of Saint-Nizier name refers to Nicetius of Lyon, a bishop of the city during the 6th century. The first religious building on the site of the present church was a Roman monument, perhaps a temple of Attis, whose worship was probably the cause of the Christian persecution in Lyon from 177. In the 5th century, according to tradition, Eucherius of Lyon, 19th bishop of Lyon, built on the ruins of the building a basilica to contain the relics of the martyrs in Lyon, tortured in 177. In the 6th century, the bishops were buried in the church, particularly Nicetius of Lyon, the 28th bishop. The body of the latter attracted a crowd and his presumed great miracles led the church to take his name.

In the early 8th century, the church has been ravaged by the Saracens and by Charles Martel. It was rebuilt in the 9th century, at the behest of the bishop Leidrade. Peter Waldo, in the 13th century, was a parishioner. His disciples, shocked by the wealth of the church, even set fire in 1253.

From the 14th century to the late 16th century, the church was gradually rebuilt. In 1562, the notables gathered in the church, and in the 17th century, the aldermen were elected in the nave. It suffered the damage caused by several bands of Huguenot, which plundered the bishops of Lyon's tombs, then those of the French Revolution.

After the French Revolution, the church served as flour warehouse. In the late 18th century, the project to transform the church into a gallery was abandoned after a petition signed by 100 notables.

The sacristy was built in 1816, and the organ was installed in 1886.

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Address

Rue Saint-Nizier, Lyon, France
See all sites in Lyon

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Valois Dynasty and Hundred Year's War (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rosemary Leblond (2 years ago)
Inspiring homily inviting us to pray daily so as to be connected to the Source of love. Beautiful architecture and welcoming congregation.
Qasim M (2 years ago)
A peaceful place to come and visit. Felt welcoming and open to all
Pedro Duque (2 years ago)
Very unexpected at work. Amazing!
Nancy Fink (2 years ago)
Beautiful 15thc church of the merchants.
Damien Gauthier (3 years ago)
Great church if you are into. Vitrail is nice
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