Schlägl Abbey is the gemstone of the Mühlviertel region. Here, at the foot of the Bohemian Forest, the members of the Premonstratensian Order have worked and lived for almost 900 years.The Gothic monastery church is furnished with three naves and is impressive due to a large staircase up to the main nave. The altars, pulpits and choir-stalls from the 17th and 18th centuries are impressive with their rich carving and inlay work give the church a warm and welcoming atmosphere.

The pipe organ from 1634, known as the Putz-Orgel in German, is among the most significant organs in Austria. The Schlägl organ concerts are popular worldwide.The Early Baroque library shows how significant science and education was to the monastery - the impressive collection comprises around 60,000 books and numerous manuscripts. In addition, the Schlägl monastery has an extensive collection of paintings with valuable Gothic panel paintings, as well as a collection of portraits in this form of all the brothers from 1802 onwards.

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Schlägl 1, Schlägl, Austria
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Details

Founded: 1202
Category: Religious sites in Austria

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Markus Treben (3 years ago)
Schöne Seminarräume, freundliche Mitarbeiter, geselliger Abt (dem ich hier nochmals für seine Gastfreundlichkeit u seinen Humor danken möchte!)
Suvendu Das (4 years ago)
Around 1203/1204 Kalhoch undertook from Falkenstein a monastery founded at the foot of the Bohemian Forest. Under extreme climatic and economic conditions, the Cistercian Abbot Theodoric began with the construction of a small group of confreres from the monastery Langheim near Bamberg. A first mention of the monastery in 1204 in a travel calculation of the Passau Bishop Wolfger von Erla, a second in a document from the year 1209, the abbot and monastery confirmed all rights and freedoms. The short history of the first Schlägler monastery ends in winter 1214/15 with the death of the abbot by exhaustion. The other brothers gave up the monastery and returned to Langheim. On July 9, 1218 Kalhoch von Falkenstein handed over the donated monastery to the Premonstratensians from the monastery Mühlhausen in Bohemia. These began around 1250 with the construction of today's monastery. A reference to the necessary clearing work can be found in the name "Slage" and in the coat of arms with the two crossed mallets. The Romanesque crypt dates back to the time of construction. Under Probst Ulrich (1304 to 1338) were major extensions such as the southern extension, the "Old Probstei". In the Middle Ages it came to further extensions: Provost Andreas Rieder (1444 to 1481) gave among other things the collegiate church its today's form, provost John III. (1481 to 1490) built a mighty defense tower. In the 16th century The Reformation movements had a detrimental effect on the discipline and subsequently on the monastery buildings, so that Provost Crispin Fuck (1609-1622) saw himself forced to a partial rebuilding. His successor Wilhelm Capreolus began with the baroque of the church, but set up after his death in 1626 rebellious peasants church and monastery on fire, which had a major destruction to the episode. The reconstruction took place under Provost Martin Graysing (1627-1665), who commissioned the baroque appearance of the church and had the northern tract and the convent tract added. Because of his merits, he was raised by the General Chapter in Premontré on May 6, 1657 abbot and Schlägl Abbey to the abbey. As a result, a total of seven heavy fires caused great damage, the last in 1850. Two years later, instead of the old stables in the east wing, the large neo-Baroque library was built, followed by the 1898 built picture gallery. The construction of a new tract in the western area in 1853/54 created the still existing enclosed courtyard.
Bernd Thoma (4 years ago)
Wir gehen immer wieder hierher zum Essen weil es ein wunderschönes Kloster mit sehr gutem Essen gibt, das nette Personal und moderate Preise runden den Ausflug ab.
Manfred Strickner (4 years ago)
Gediegenes Prämonstratenser Kloster mit sehr schöner Barock-Kirche und eigener Brauerei
Maria Langmaier (4 years ago)
sehr gastfreundlicher einladender Ort. Lädt ein zum verweilen. In der Stiftstaverne gibt es eine gute regionale Küche und das Hauseigene Bier schmeckt sowieso!
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