Wik Castle is one of the best preserved medieval castles in Sweden. The first owner was Israel And in the end of 13th century. The current magnificent castle with seven floors was built in the late 15th century. The massive walls and moats made the stronghold impregnable. During the Middle Ages, the castle was one of the sturdiest strongholds in the Mälaren Valley, and Gustav Wasa once besieged Wik Castle for over a year without ever managing to get inside the walls. It was modified to the present French-style appearance in the 17th century.

Wik Castle has been owned by several noble families like Sparre, Bielke, Horn von Liewe, de Geer and von Essen. Today it is owned by the county council of Uppsala and used primarily for the council's own conference activities. It is at present closed to the public.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.
  • Uppsala Tourism

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Address

Viks mur 27, Uppsala, Sweden
See all sites in Uppsala

Details

Founded: ca. 1450
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Алена Вишина (9 months ago)
The castle itself is really unique and pretty and the land around was quite nice, especially in autumn. There're some nice walks around the castle, beautiful views of the lake. However you won't be able to get into the castle and there's no cafe or anything to get some food, so it's mole like a nature walk around a pretty small castle.
Maria Karlin (10 months ago)
Nice place for a quick trip from Uppsala city. The castle is by the water and perfect for long walks.
Loora (11 months ago)
Cosy place, close to nice swimming spots. Defenitely nice area for weekend get aways and for nice walks.
shoori (12 months ago)
The area around the castle is very beautiful and the castle itself is pretty. There's a nice bathing area with a jump tower, but not much of restaurants of you plan on eating. However they do have a small café.
Chrille (12 months ago)
It was nice there. They have a nice cafe and beach!
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