Schloss Benrath is a Baroque-style maison de plaisance (pleasure palace) in Benrath, which is now a borough of Düsseldorf. It was erected for the Elector Palatine Charles Theodor and his wife, Countess Palatine Elisabeth Auguste of Sulzbach, by his garden and building director Nicolas de Pigage. Construction began in 1755 and was completed in 1770. The ensemble at Benrath has been proposed for designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The main building, the central corps de logis, for the Elector Palatine and his wife is flanked by two arched symmetrical wings, the maisons de cavalière, which originally housed the servants. They partially surround a circular pond, the Schlossweiher (palace pond), in the north. On the southside lies a long rectangular pond, the Spiegelweiher (mirror pond). From the predescant castle, which stood formerly in the mid of the long rectangular pond on the southside of the palace, is conserved only one of the servant wings, the so-called Alte Orangerie (Old Orangery).

The main building is a museum with guided tours. Sometimes music concerts are also performed. The two wings house two museums since 2002: the Museum for European Garden Art in the east wing and the Museum of Natural History in the west wing.

The palace is surrounded by a baroque square hunting park with two crossing diagonal alleys and a circular alley.

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Details

Founded: 1755-1770
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dalmacio Diaz (2 years ago)
Awesome place I like it many trails to walk the place is huge
Gomay (2 years ago)
It is nice but museum is little bit expensive. I guess it good for summer to hang out but i do not recommend for winter: it is just too muddy.
tetsuya enomoto (2 years ago)
An ideal location for a long walk. Lots of nature, big garden, by the water. There are two restaurants. One is by the Rhein river, and other one is by the gate towards the train station. Very peaceful place.
Rohit Ranjan (2 years ago)
A nice place. The elegant part of this palace is the garden, adjacent to the palace .The only drawback of this place is the the description are all in German.
Karl Wilz (2 years ago)
Awesome!! Absolutely fantastic. The guided tour is a must. You get so much more insight of life and details of everything 250 years ago
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