Lehmbruck Museum

Duisburg, Germany

Lehmbruck Museum is devoted for Wilhelm Lehmbruck (1881-1919) and his sculptures make up a large part of its collection. However, the museum has a substantial amount of works by other 20th-century sculptors, including Ernst Barlach, Käthe Kollwitz, Ludwig Kasper, Hermann Blumenthal, Alexander Archipenko, Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Henri Laurens, Jacques Lipchitz, Alexander Rodtschenko, Laszlo Péri, Naum Gabo, Antoine Pevsner, Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalíand Max Ernst. This is complemented by a considerable number of paintings by 19th- and 20th-century German artists. The museum circulates its substantial collection by re-installing works on an annual basis.

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Details

Founded: 1964
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Cold War and Separation (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nick McCluskey (2 years ago)
Small, confusing to find the entrance, unfriendly staff and not worth the price.
Wes Maciejewski (2 years ago)
Kinda neat, but I suppose you need to be into Lehmbruck.
Elena Gusa (2 years ago)
Modern art...
Steve Berkwitz (2 years ago)
Very nice museum featuring the wonderful sculptures of Wilhelm Lehmbruck, with space given over to special exhibits and other modern art. Walking distance from the Duisburg Hauptbahnhof. Worth the price of admission.
Festus T. Ejikemeuwa (4 years ago)
Lots of art works
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