Blankenheim Castle

Blankenheim, Germany

Blankenheim Castle was built around 1115 by Gerhard I and became the family seat of the House of Blankenheim. The lords of Blankenheim were elevated to the countship in 1380.

The site has been remodelled on numerous occasions. In the course of time the medieval defensive site was converted into a Baroque schloss with a Baroque garden and an orangery. Its end came in September 1794, when French troops marched into Blankenheim. Countess Augusta of Manderscheid-Blankenheim and her family fled to Bohemia.

For a long time the castle remained uninhabited until, in 1894, Prussia started work on safety measures. In 1926 it was taken over by the German Gymnastics Club and, in 1936, the site was acquired by the German Youth Hostel Association. They converted the castle into a youth hostel.

In 1996 the wildlife park tunnel was rediscovered. It is a noteworthy water supply gallery. Although the River Ahr flows nearby, the castle depended on rainwater. As a result, Count Dietrich III of Manderscheid-Blankenheim had a water supply tunnel excavated in 1469. The water from the spring In der Rhenn was thereby diverted from about a kilometre away and led to the castle.

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Details

Founded: c. 1115
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

M. S. (20 months ago)
Ok
Gints Kļaviņš (2 years ago)
Here the river Ahr begins. Beautiful town
Alexander Theunissen (2 years ago)
It was incredible. Near at the hostel ja a great Tower, there is a great Party every night
jens wittmann (2 years ago)
Youthhostel in a castle. Great Platt zu stay over night.
Rick Verhoog (3 years ago)
Beautiful surroundings, nice inside! Has a few low ceilings though, so watch out! Also some fun activities around and amazing landscapes.
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