Deutz Abbey Church

Cologne, Germany

Deutz Abbey was founded in 1003 on the site of a Roman fort by the future Saint Heribert, Archbishop of Cologne, close adviser of Emperor Otto III. Heribert died in 1021 and was buried in the Romanesque church he had had built here. The theologian Rupert of Deutz was abbot during the 1120s.

The abbey had extensive properties, but its strategic position by the Rhine exposed it to involvement in fighting, and it was destroyed in the 14th century and again in the 16th century. It was dissolved during the secularisation of the Napoleonic era, but the abbey church, now known as Alt St. Heribert, became a parish church in 1804.

In World War II it was heavily damaged and only the ground floor and remnants of the Romanesque cellar were preserved. Reconstruction took place in the 1970s. Today the former abbey accommodates an old people's home run by Caritas. Notable are the mural paintings by the artist Werner Weber. The former abbey church of Alt St. Heribert is now used by the Greek Orthodox community of Cologne, and has been superseded as a Roman Catholic parish church by Neu St. Heribert, which now houses the shrine of Saint Heribert.

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Address

Kennedyplatz, Cologne, Germany
See all sites in Cologne

Details

Founded: 1003
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Panagiotis Perdikis (15 months ago)
Na Mas boithai panagiamas
Maria Kio.-Clement (2 years ago)
Sehr schöne orthodoxe Kirche! Außen etwas unscheinbar, innen aber schön ausgestattet mit schönen Ikonen, einem schönen bemusterten roten Teppich vom Eingang bis zum Altar. Hell, freundlich und mit einem super Pfarrer der immer ein offenes Ohr für einen hat.
Δημήτριος Κουκίδης (2 years ago)
Μία όμορφη Ελληνική εκκλησία της κολωνίας
Andreas Schröder (2 years ago)
Würde sie immer wieder anschauen, weil sie ist sehr gut.
the hypnotoad (2 years ago)
Unfassbar gut. Mit dem oben ohne Tanz und dem all you Can eat Buffet hab ich nicht gerechnet
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