St. Maria im Kapitol

Cologne, Germany

St. Maria im Kapitol is an 11th-century Romanesque church located in the Kapitol-Viertel in the old town of Cologne. It was dedicated to St. Mary and built between 1040 and 1065. It is one of twelve Romanesque churches built in Cologne during this period.

Measuring 100 m x 40 m and encompassing 4,000 square metres of internal space, St. Maria is the largest of the Romanesque churches in Cologne. Like many of the latter, it has an east end which is trefoil in shape, with three apses. It has a nave and aisles and three towers to the west. It is considered the most important work of German church architecture of the Salian dynasty.

The first Maria im Kapitol church is said to have been built by Plectrudis, wife of Pippin in the 8th century. The foundations of a Roman temple from the late 1st century AD, dedicated to the Capitoline Triad, and those of a church from the year 690 AD, can be visited in the church's crypt. 

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Details

Founded: 1040-1065
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Shigella deShige (3 years ago)
Wonderful place with long history. Unfortunately it suffered during WWII, but it was rebuilt. Church is located outside strict city centre, but I believe it is worth seeing. Church provides little leaflets describing the important monuments inside
Rolf Weller (3 years ago)
Schöne alte Kirche sollte man sich wirklich Mal anschauen
Didier Loiseau (3 years ago)
Étonnant de trouver cette belle église cachée derrière ces bâtiments d'habitation. Après un petit cloître (pas en très bon état), on découvre une église à la taille et à la forme inattendues. À voir !
Branden Lee (4 years ago)
Please don't miss out peaceful holly place in cologne.
Murilo Ribeiro (6 years ago)
Beautiful
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