Vattholma Ironworks

Vattholma, Sweden

The Vattholma ironworks is one of the oldest in Sweden. Smelters are believed to have been active here back as far as the 15th century. Wattholma operated under the Crown until the end of the 16th century. Walloon forging was introduced during the 1600s and was used until the 1870s, when it was replaced by the Lancashire method. Wattholma also featured a blast furnace that was moved in 1758. Bar iron production ceased in 1905, but manufactory smithing and foundry operations continued.

The works were sold in 1939 to a fire appliance store in Stockholm. Housing was added in the 18th and 19th centuries. The old inn with its walled courtyard is found here, along with a storehouse and school. On the opposite side of Fyrisån River is the manorhouse, with its main structure from 1812 and annex from the 1700s. Most of the old buildings were demolished in the early 1970s and replaced with modern residences that resemble the originals.

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Details

Founded: 1545
Category: Industrial sites in Sweden
Historical period: Early Vasa Era (Sweden)

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