Fréjus Roman Amphitheatre

Fréjus, France

Fréjus Roman Amphitheatre was built at the end of the 1st century AD. This structure, made of small tiles of local green sandstone, could accommodate up to 10,000 spectators. It most likely hosted gladiator fights and wild beast hunts. Today, this building comes to life every summer: large concerts, dancefloors and various performances form a rich and diverse program.

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Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

More Information

en.frejus.fr

Rating

3.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Colquitt (3 years ago)
Cool history but why dump tons of concrete on top of it.
Rachel Price (4 years ago)
Very little of the original amphitheater left. We paid to watch them set up for a concert and that was about it. No sense of the history of the place. Have a look from outside while having a glass of wine at the bar ..... much better idea
Herwart Pusch (4 years ago)
Great location for any kind of event.
S L Happy (4 years ago)
A modern architecture built upon Roman ruins. It was built at the end of 1st century AD. It was the playground of gladiators before the ban of gladiators fights in 4th century and remained unused since then. Though the restoration process lost the original structure of the building, it is a nice place to roam around with glimpses of history.
Marijke Vandermaesen (4 years ago)
Ancient romain amphitheater. Rebuild partially. We were luckly to see a show about romain gladiator fights. Nice to combine with the mosaic musea in the neighboorhood
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