Steninge Palace

Märsta, Sweden

The Baroque-style Steninge Palace was built 1694-1698 to the design of architect Nicodemus Tessin the Younger, the palace is directly inspired by Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte in France, and has a reputation in Sweden as one of the most elegant examples of Baroque mansions. Steninge Palace was completed in 1705.

The history of Steninge began in the end of 1200’s when the first known settlement was established. In 1667 Carl Gyllenstierna acquired the Steninge manor and between 1680-81 the well-known Swedish architect Nicodemus Tessin the Younger was commissioned to design the palace and the two wings. The manor was owned by the Fersen family between 1735-1873. In 1810 Axel von Fersen was murdered and a monument for him was erected at Steninge in 1813. In 1873 Baron von Otter buys Steninge and a stone barn was built west of the palace. Today the palace is privately owned by Steninge Palace Cultural Centre, but open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1680-1705
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Giouli Sour (6 months ago)
Perfect!!!
曹晓芳 (10 months ago)
Nice location but not open for tourists. Beautiful houses with beautiful baraquc garden.
Irina Kvistberg (2 years ago)
Very beautiful historical place. Decorated with love and great taste. I think a great place for parties and friendly meetings. Food and dishes are common, but fresh. I think that if there are more people, they will be able to find a unique face.
Emile Bremmer (2 years ago)
Seems the castle itself is closed to the public which is a shame
Gasan el tai (2 years ago)
Nice place , good cafe one can buy good meals or drink , Very nice butik, Beautiful gardins
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