Västeråker Church

Uppsala, Sweden

Västeråker church is one of few medieval churches in Sweden, which age, builder and building donations are well-known. The curch was built in 1331 and donated by Lady Ramborg, chatelaine of the near Wik Castle. Fine lightweight arches of the church are well-preserved and made with high quality, because Lady Ramborg hired labour who had been building the Uppsala Cathedral.

Most of the mural paintings date from the 1470’s. Lady Ramborg’s picture is carved in the rare copper cenotaph made in Flanders in 1327. The doors of altar have been made in Lübeck and moved from Tensta Church in 1870. The Renaissance style pulpit was made by Hans Hebel in 1659.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: 1331
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tobias Johannesson (2 years ago)
Liliane Holm (2 years ago)
Jordens vackraste plats.
Erika Dollbring (2 years ago)
Lajos J. Hajdu (2 years ago)
Marvelous old church in the southern edge of Uppsala, near the Lake Mälaren. In Viking ages the water level was probably directly at the church. The memorial garden at the clock tower is beautiful. The church is not painted by Albertus Pictor but is very much in class with Härkeberga kyrka. Worth a visit.
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