Salnecke is one of the best preserved 17th century castles in Uppland. The first known owner of Salnecke was a judge Karl Ingeborgasson Lejonbalk. He sold the farm to the Skokloster nunnery in 1302. Later it belonged to Bo Jonsson Grip and the monastery of St. Clare in Stockholm. The monastery was the owner until 1460, when Salnecke fell to archbishop Jons Bengtsson (Oxenstierna).

After Reformation Salnecke became a crown property. Gustav II Adolphus gave the farm to the council Filip Sadler in 1626. After his death in 1641 Salnecke was given to Grissbach. The castle belonged to his family until 1730's. Salnecke was acquired by Klas Samuel Jonas Gyllenadler in the 1830s and it is still in his family's possession.

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Details

Founded: 1640's
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Katarina Hellström (2 years ago)
Jag stod där som försäljare på marknaden och det var toppen.
Lena-Britt Bodin (2 years ago)
Fantastiskt. Jättefint ordnat och väldigt mysigt.
Lars Johanson (2 years ago)
Ett utflyktsmål som ligger jättefint och ta gärna med familjen på en fika
Sussie Olofsson (2 years ago)
Ingen möjlighet se slottet. Det finns en informationsskylt vid butiken. Men där fanns ingen direkt info om platsen el slottet. Blev lite besviken på detta. Trevligt med delikatessbutik och café.
Sébastien Horion (3 years ago)
Nice place to taste local products
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