Church of San Andrés

Madrid, Spain

The Church de San Andrés is located on the site of a former church from the times of Moorish occupation. The former church had been frequented as a parish church by the patron saint of Madrid, San Isidro Labrador, and his wife Santa María de la Cabeza, who lived nearby.

The adjacent chapel of San Isidro was built at the site of the saint's house. Its construction began in 1657, after the saint was canonized in 1622. Further reconstructions were performed in 1663 and 1669, and later in 1783 and 1789. The initial construction in Baroque style was fashioned by José de Villarreal, and later Pedro de la Torre and Juan de Lobera. Much of the internal decoration, including paintings, were destroyed during the Spanish Civil War.

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Founded: 1657
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bartłomiej Ufnal (3 years ago)
Beautiful Catholic temple with majestic dome with sculptures. A lot of cosy seats but inside is little cold.
Alina Gutovica (3 years ago)
Looks good at night
Martin Tortora (5 years ago)
is in the almedro street n 10 its facade is built of slate if you look we can see roks oxidated
Martin jaras (5 years ago)
The Church of San Andres was built in the seventeenth century, in a fully baroque style, to house the relics of San's body Isidro. In the Church of San Andrés we can identify some rocks already known: 9 the columns and ashlars of granite, 9 religious images carved in limestone, 9 the pavement around the Church formed by basalt, granite and limestone.
Krisztián Király (5 years ago)
good location, very close to the most important things. the rooms are not very big, but the size is just enough for you if you are a tourist.
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