Basilica di San Calimero

Milan, Italy

The Basilica di San Calimero is a church in Milan, northern Italy. Its name refers to Saint Calimerius (died 190 AD), an early bishop of the city. It dates from the 5th century but was almost completely rebuilt in 1882 by the architect Angelo Colla in an attempt to restore it to the 'original' medieval structure.

What remains of the ancient church include: the 16th century crypt, with a noble frescoed vault by the Fiammenghini; a small fresco with the Madonna and Two Female Saints (15th century, attributed to Cristoforo Moretti) in the apse; a Crucifixion by Il Cerano, and a noteworthy Nativity by Marco d'Oggiono. Other medieval frescoes are in the annexed sacristy.

The crypt also houses Calimerius' relics and a pit located in the same place in which the former's bones were found in the water.

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Address

Via San Calimero 9, Milan, Italy
See all sites in Milan

Details

Founded: 1882
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Draga Marijanovski (13 months ago)
Peaceful, beautiful, magical. It opens at 9.30h. Once afternoon was closed to take care about the orari di apertura. Entrance is beautiful, with the representation of the blue sky with stars.
Annabella Santos (4 years ago)
Sacred church/place
Malkanthi Prabha Nissanka (4 years ago)
God bless all...
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