San Vincenzo in Prato

Milan, Italy

San Vincenzo in Prato is the only church in Milan which has entirely maintained its original Palaeo-Christian appearance. The first church was founded by the Lombard king Desiderius in 770, who dedicated it to the Virgin Mary. Later it was entitled to St. Vincent, when the latter's relics were found in an urn in the crypt, together with those of St. Quirinus and St. Nicomedes (859) and St. Abundius. The name in Prato derives from its location in the 'pratum' (in the field) area owned by bishop Odelpertus.

In 806 a Benedictine convent was added to the church; in the late years of the same century and in the early 10th century the church, in dismaying conditions, was rebuilt, but with similar appearance. The octagonal baptistery on the exterior, on the left, was built by architect Paolo Mezzanotte in year 1932, and includes a column-shaped font called Pietra santa (the Saint Stone) coming from the ancient church of S. Nazaro in Pietra Santa, which was demolished in year 1889 during the construction of the new Via Dante. The convent was suppressed in 1520 and in 1598 the church was restored and turned into a parish.

The basilica measures c. 40 x 20 m, and is in brickwork. The interior is on a nave and two aisles with wooden spans ceiling. The columns are from different ages. The elevated choir ends with a large apse. Under the presbytery is the crypt, which has also a nave and two aisles divided by ten small columns with sculpted capitals.

San Vincenzo lies on the founding of a Roman temple or oratory built along the way to Vigevano probably dedicated to Juppiter, which was located within a Roman necropolis (of which some remains are visible in the external left walls of the church).

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 770 AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marie Stella “VAGABONDA 1958” Alata (6 months ago)
I attended a funeral and the mass was very solemn.The priest said a beautiful homily. The chapel is big enough.
Anita Cavigioli (10 months ago)
A little-known church, in a small square behind shopping streets. Ancient, sober and silent, it is worth a visit. The crypt in particular offers a moment of silence out of time, for a pause for meditation
Anna Cascarano (12 months ago)
Paleochristian church very simple but full of significant elements. The crypt and the baptistery with the sacred stone are very beautiful. The square on which it overlooks is also delightful
Alma Marisol Delgado (13 months ago)
Wonderful church, very old, these days we find the Holy Pilgrim Madonna of Fatima, so at different times of the day there are masses, adorations, etc.
Elena Bettani (16 months ago)
Ancient early Christian church in the Porta Genova area in Milan. Very beautiful crypt. External octagonal baptistery with marble baptismal font.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Doune Castle

Doune Castle was originally built in the thirteenth century, then probably damaged in the Scottish Wars of Independence, before being rebuilt in its present form in the late 14th century by Robert Stewart, Duke of Albany (c. 1340–1420), the son of King Robert II of Scots, and Regent of Scotland from 1388 until his death. Duke Robert"s stronghold has survived relatively unchanged and complete, and the whole castle was traditionally thought of as the result of a single period of construction at this time. The castle passed to the crown in 1425, when Albany"s son was executed, and was used as a royal hunting lodge and dower house.

In the later 16th century, Doune became the property of the Earls of Moray. The castle saw military action during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms and Glencairn"s rising in the mid-17th century, and during the Jacobite risings of the late 17th century and 18th century.