Castello Cova

Milan, Italy

Castello Cova was built between 1910 and 1915 on a design by architect Adolfo Coppedè (brother of the more famous Gino Coppedè), it is an example of Gothic Revival architecture, with guelph-style merlons decorating the external rusticated walls as well as the middle-ages styled tower. The tower of Castello Cova was reportedly an inspiration for the architects of the Velasca Tower, a landmark skyscraper in the centre of Milan. The Pusterla di Sant'Ambrogio, an ancient postern of the Medieval walls of Milan facing Castello Cova, was recreated in the late 1930s in a style that matches the Revival style of the Castello.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1910-1915
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

mamo camara (6 months ago)
Good place
Roberto Vavassori (7 months ago)
Curious residence in medieval style but of modern construction that stands out for its beauty and particularity among the buildings in the area.
Edoardo Quiriti (7 months ago)
Wow
Odika Chiemezie (2 years ago)
I have a wonderful experience ☺
Roberto Soriano Doménech (2 years ago)
The tower may make you think of a Castle, but it is a palace. A building that will surely attract our attention when we walk through Milan and totally recommended to visit.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.