Masthugget Church

Gothenburg, Sweden

Masthugget Church was built in 1914. Its position on a high hill (Masthugget) close to the city and near the Göta älv (Göta river) makes it a striking sight – the church tower is 60 meters high in itself. The church represents the national romantic style in Nordic architecture and was drawn by Sigfrid Ericson. The church, which has become one of the symbols of Gothenburg, is a popular tourist attraction.

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Details

Founded: 1914
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Diario Latino (3 years ago)
Wonderful church, absolutely a place to see inside
Jimena Rodriguez (3 years ago)
One of the best viewpoints in Gothenburg
Elise M (3 years ago)
I would definitely recommend a visit to this church for anyone visiting Gothenburg. The view from the area surrounding the church is incredible because you can see the city from every side, not just the downtown area. I wasn’t able to spend too much time inside the church because there was a choir rehearsal going on, but visitors are very welcome and there is no entry fee.
Jonathan Lundberg (3 years ago)
Entirely made out of wood. The view up there is stunning. Well worth the walk!
Thomas Shoback (4 years ago)
Simply beautiful because of it's mix of old world character, distinctive architecture and furnishings inside &out, and it's focus on it's mission. We travelled from the US and arrive via ferry, and seeing the church while sailing in was something that will not be forgotten.
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