Torslanda Church

Torslanda, Sweden

The medieval Torslanda Church is one of the oldest churches on Hisingen and in the whole city, as the oldest part of the building, the nave is estimated to have been erected in the 12th century. The porch was added in 1766; the choir in 1780 and the sacristy in 1806.

Some of the interior of the church is also notable. There are two baptismal fonts - one made of stone, dating back to the 13th century, and a wooden one from the 16th century. The wooden pulpit was built in 1627. There is also a crucifix hanging above the entrance to the choir, made in the late 15th century and renovated in 1896. The 15th century altarpiece depicts God surrounded by the Twelve Apostles. However, Judas Iscariot is not present - he is substituted by king Olaf II of Norway with a wild beast under his feet. This symbolizes the triumph of Christianity over paganism in Norway.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ida Sol (2 years ago)
Lagom stor kyrka. Välskött gravplats där friden tyvärr störs en smula av den näraliggande Kongahällavägen.
Mikael Levin (2 years ago)
Torslanda och Tuve Kyrkorna från 1100 talet är Göteborgs äldsta byggnader, äldsta delarnas byggnadstid. Många skulle säga Kronhuset som är från 1650 talet. Det finns äldre lämningar av byggnader, men en hög med sten räknas inte.
Zeljko Tipura (2 years ago)
Veldigt fin liten gammal kyrka.
Eva Egelmyr (3 years ago)
En fin gammal kyrka med mycket gamla träd och gravar.
Olof Petrén Olauson (3 years ago)
This is a historical site with not only one of the oldest churches of Sweden but also preserved, the tree of sacrifice used by the Norse before Christianity reached the north. This tree is over a thousand years old.
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