Clonard Monastery was developed by the Catholic Redemptorists religious order. Members of this religious order came to Belfast originally in 1896. They initially built a small tin church in the grounds of Clonard House in 1897. In 1890 a monastery was opened in these grounds and in 1911 the Church of the Holy Redeemer opened in the grounds and replaced the tin church.

Clonard is also used as a music venue for many festivals in the city, most notably Féile an Phobail and holds an annual Novena which attracts over 100,000 tourists, Catholic and Protestant, from Ireland and Europe every year.

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Founded: 1890
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Hugh Gallagher (6 months ago)
At clonard monastery you always feel at home since the lock down l have not missed mass there And the priests always feel part of the community. God Bless
James Mc laughlin (7 months ago)
Loving the friendly atmosphere of Clonard during such difficult times, God bless, from St Augustines Coatbridge.
Karen Ritchie (10 months ago)
Have never been but have watched every morning and have had a wonderful spiritual experience at the 7am masses would love to visit one day
Sandra Paredes (11 months ago)
It's a beautiful place and I will try go someday, also was a such great idea celebrate the mass through web cam ,I'd love it....
Frances Killen (12 months ago)
We were able to watch the Easter Vigil mass last night on webcam. It was beautiful.The Altar was also beautiful. Thank you to everyone who helped to make this possible. Especially all the priests. May you all have a blessed and Holy Easter. ❤
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