The Round Tower and Witch's Stone are impressive reminders of Antrim’s ancient monastic settlement. The tower was built around the 10th century as a bell-tower for protection from raiders and is known locally as The Steeple. It is 28 metres tall and is one of the finest of its kind in Ireland. The monastic site was burned in 1147.

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Founded: 10th century
Category: Religious sites in United Kingdom

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discovernorthernireland.com

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Taylor Gawn (3 months ago)
Great for golf
lawrence sharp (4 months ago)
Ideal spot for drone flying
Jamie-Lee Culbert (4 months ago)
Lovely for a walk not much at it but plenty of space for dogs
Sarah Ingram (6 months ago)
Soo beautiful . Soo much history
William Marks (9 months ago)
Very nice well maintained round tower worth visiting
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