Audleystown Court Cairn

Downpatrick, United Kingdom

Audleystown Court Cairn is a dual court grave situated near the south shore of Strangford Lough. It is a, now roofless, trapezoidal long cairn, with the sides revetted by dry-stone walling almost 27m long and a shallow forecourt at each end opening into a burial gallery of four chambers.

 

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Founded: Prehistoric
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

chuck mac (13 months ago)
Not too much to see, but you get the jist of what went on.
Joe D (3 years ago)
Fantastic example of a neolithic tomb, the surrounding scenery is outstanding, a nice walk down to it also.
Jason Crozier (4 years ago)
Brilliant example of of Neolithic Court tomb. One of the more difficult sites to access as it is not particularly well signposted. Parking is very restricted so cars may have to be abandoned at the top of a private lane. After a decent walk down, you must cross through two fields, the gates of which are not particularly accessible, so decently sturdy footware would be a requirement. Once through to the second field, the tomb is encompassed by the typical green fence with airlock style gate. The grass had been recently cut on our visit so the site appears to be regularly maintained. The tomb itself is structurally magnificent and beautifully complete. Stunning views of the sea and nearby islands.
Antho Kirkypat (4 years ago)
Hard to find (for us anyway) but good fun none the less. It was a fine day so that helped. Like alot of monuments of this ilk there could be more information provided. Overall, would recommend a visit if only for stunning views over Lough.
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