Monzón de Campos Castle

Monzón de Campos, Spain

Monzón de Campos Castle was built in the 14th century by the Rojas family on the remains of an earlier castle which was contemporary one. The keep, made of high quality ashlar masonry, has no openings besides a couple of small arrow slits which gives it a severe appearance.

The oldest part is the elevated entrance of the present tower of homage.The coat of arms on the pointed arch of the main gate belongs to the Rojas family.

Inside, the castle has not preserved the original distribution except in the tower. A Romanesque door was added to the tower of homage. It was brought in from a church that had been covered by the water of the dam in Aguilar de Campoo. The village of Monzón, with its castle, was the centre of a county donated to the Ansúrez family by the kings of León during the 10th and 11th centuries and in the 15th and 16th centuries it was owned by the Rojas, a family from Burgos that since 1530 had the title of Marquises of Poza. They are likely to have built the present castle in Monzón de Campos.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Justiniano de Campos (2 years ago)
Una pena q lleve 15 años cerrado. Deteriorándose y vigilando ciego el horizonte. Q extraordinaria atalaya para un centro de congresos o un restaurante bien gestionado. Q pena q uno de los castillos más antiguos de España muera de soledad
Alex Fuentes (2 years ago)
Bonito Castillo. Tiene un parking arriba, en el mismo Castillo. No lo vi abierto. Exteriormente bien cuidado
JUAN CARLOS TR (2 years ago)
Solo se puede ver por fuera. Hay aparcamiento. Entorno muy bonito y muy buenas vistas.
Pirata 57 B (2 years ago)
Muy bonito el exterior, bien cuidado, con grandes vistas, pero cerrado al público. Era un antiguo hotel.
Valentin Del Barrio Rojo (3 years ago)
Ok
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