Pula Roman Theatre

Pula, Croatia

The smaller Roman Theatre of Pula from the 1st century AD was erected on the slope underneath the Venetian fortress. The area was divided into the stage and the proscene where the acting took place, the orchestra and the viewing area or the cavea. The theatre lied on the hill slope, which was the characteristic of Greek theatres. Only the stage foundations and a part of the semi-circular viewing area of the Small Roman Theatre have remained preserved. During the Antiquity, the theatre occupied a larger space not visible today in view of never completed archaeological surveys. Its capacity was estimated between 4 and 5 thousand spectators, which was the entire population of Pula at the time. Today, as in the Roman times, the twin gates lead to the theatre. In front of it is the Archaeological Museum, once the site of the German high school.

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Address

Hercuov prolaz 1, Pula, Croatia
See all sites in Pula

Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

More Information

www.istria-culture.com

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matthew Douglas (6 months ago)
A stunning amphitheater that’s the best preserved of its kind. Many famous performances have been hosted here in recent times. It’s got super clean toilets and is surrounded by local coffees houses a few minutes walk. From the top seats you can see the sea. Parking is good quality but limited and super busy.
Karan Jain (11 months ago)
We really loved the Arena. It's really well preserved and views from inside are divine. The price of admission is well worth it, as is the guided audio tour. As one of the best preserved coliseums, it really is a marvel of Roman architecture. The best bit is the opportunity to see concerts and performances here. We saw the old gladiator performance and it was really cool. Highly recommended!
Mike McCully (12 months ago)
Incredible! Loved wandering around the arena. Unlike the Roman coliseum, you can wander over and under every part of the arena with the cost of admission. Get a guided tour if you can, that will make the experience better. Exit through the gift shop!
Nikola Horvat - Tesla (12 months ago)
Stunning place of Roman history. The Pula Arena is a Roman amphitheatre located in Pula, Croatia. It is the only remaining Roman amphitheatre to have four side towers entirely preserved. It was constructed between 27 BC and AD 68, and is among the world's six largest surviving Roman arenas. The arena is also the country's best-preserved ancient monument.
Bart Samwel (14 months ago)
Very nice old amphitheatre from the first century. We visited the gladiator spectacle in the evening, which was a lot of fun! If you visit the spectacle, you don't need to visit the amphitheatre during the daytime, the only thing you'll miss is the underground museum and the tickets are the same price so you'd pay twice.
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