Arch of the Sergii

Pula, Croatia

Arch of the Sergii is an Ancient Roman triumphal arch located in Pula, Croatia. The arch commemorates three brothers of the Sergii family, specifically Lucius Sergius Lepidus, a tribune serving in the twenty-ninth legion that participated in the Battle of Actium and disbanded in 27 BC . This suggests an approximate date of construction to 29-27 BC. The arch stood behind the original naval gate of the early Roman colony. The Sergii were a powerful family of officials in the colony and retained their power for centuries.

The honorary triumphal arch, originally a city gate, was erected as a symbol of the victory at Actium. As the main inscription proclaims, it was paid for by the wife of Lepidus, Salvia Postuma Sergia, sister of the three brothers. Both of their names are carved in the stone along with Lucius Sergius and Gaius Sergius, the honoree's father and uncle respectively. In its original form, statues of the two elders flanked Lepidus on both sides on the top of the arch. On either side of the inscription, a frieze depicts cupids, garlands and bucrania.

This small arch with pairs of crenelated Corinthian columns and winged victories in the spandrels, was built on the facade of a gate (Porta Aurea) in the walls, so the part, visible from the town-side, was decorated. The decoration is late hellenistic, with major Asia Minor influences. The low relief on the frieze represents a scene with a war chariot drawn by horses.

This arch has attracted the attention of many artists, like Michelangelo.

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Details

Founded: 29-27 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joan Prowse (15 months ago)
Not much to report as the monument is free to view. As expected and great if you like the thought of seeing something that was built over 2000 years ago as it is still intact and good to see up close.
Jordan Quinn (15 months ago)
Located directing at the opposite end of the Forum as Forum Square, this Arch is literally the gateway to the modern day Forum. Once passing through the Arch you will experience old Pula at it's finest. For hundreds of meters the Forum is lined with clothing, jewelry, candy, ice-cream, novelty items, restaurants, coffee shops, and more. As for my wife and I, this is one of our favorite places to spend our time in Pula when we feel like taking a stroll in the early morning or evening.
Tatjana (15 months ago)
Named the Golden Gate, this is a beautiful ancient Roman remain dated 27 BC. It is amazing to see it and wonder about all the history this rich architectural craft has witnessed. Feeling fortunate to have been born in this city and stomping the same grounds as the Romans did centuries ago. Precious for a history lover.
aljosa herak (16 months ago)
. MBTriumphal Arch or Golden gate used to be one of two entries is in Pula...more than 3000 years ago. I knew my mum was holding and was taking me through Golden Door :) then kindergarten auntie, then girl I liked... every time different story would go under the same old Arch, leaving the end of story unknown. My story goes on, Arch is still on one the same place.. waiting for for million other stories to come..
Gustavo Molitor Porcides (17 months ago)
What a sight to behold. In very good shape. You can clearly see the engravings on the rock and even read some stuff that is near it's top.
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