Bernegg Castle was built in the mid to late 13th century for the Freiherr von Calfreisen, though it was probably called Calfreisen Castle until the 15th century. A mention of Otto von Calfreisen in 1231 indicates that the family lived in the area before the castle was built. They may have lived in an earlier castle which was replaced in the mid 13th century or in the village. In 1259 and again in 1286 the Freiherr was mentioned in the castle. After the extinction of the Calfreisen family in the 14th century, the castle was acquired by the Unterwegen family. Hans von Underwegen was mentioned at the castle in 1386, though they may have acquired it earlier. In 1428 it was acquired by the Sprecher family, who changed the name to Bernegg. The castle then vanishes from the historical record until the mid 16th century when it was described as a ruin.

Castle site

The castle ruin is located on a hill south of Calfreisen village. The palas is a rectangular building about 11 by 13 meters and four stories tall. The walls are 2.4–2 m thick at the base, tapering to 1.8 m on the upper levels. The ground floor probably served as the castle's cellar. The second story has several small arrow slits in the walls. One of the arrow slits on the south wall was expanded into a door way which now serves as the entrance into the castle. The original high entrance on the third story south wall is still intact. The remains of a brick oven can be seen on the fourth story.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

User Reviews

Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Historic Village of Olargues

Olargues is a good example of a French medieval town and rated as one of the most beautiful villages in France. It was occupied by the Romans, the Vandals and the Visigoths. At the end of the 11th century the Jaur valley came under the authority of the Château of the Viscount of Minerve. The following centuries saw a succession of wars and epidemics, and it was not until the 18th century that Olargues became re-established. This was due to the prosperity of local agriculture and artisanal industry.

The Pont du Diable, 'Devil's Bridge', is said to date back to 1202 and is reputed to be the scene of transactions between the people of Olargues and the devil. The old village is clustered around the belltower, which was formerly the main tower of the castle (Romanesque construction). The old shops have marble frontages and overhanging upper storeys. A museum of popular traditions and art is to be found in the stairs of the Commanderie.