Chur Roman Ruins

Chur, Switzerland

Several prehistoric settlements and remains of a Roman road station have been discovered in Welschdörfli, the old town district in Chur. You can visit the excavations and discoveries on the Ackermann grounds on Seilerbahnweg.

The protective structures covering the archaeological sites from the Roman era were built in 1986 according to designs by local architect Peter Zumthor. They do not only protect the finds, they are also a museum and architectural masterpiece. The weighty building with its delicate rilled outer surface is reminiscent of the original Roman edifices.

You can get the key to the protective structures from the Chur Tourism information centre at the station.

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Founded: 15 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Switzerland

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

onez ssum (5 months ago)
mustgoplace the master of architecture you have to get a key from tourist center or museum. please check the photo about information i uploaded. 20chf deposit.
Tim Stoop (4 years ago)
Great architecture with a nice exposition. You can get the entrance key at the chur tourism office at the station for a 50 EUR/chf deposit. Entrance itself costs 3 chf.
Kory Kerber (4 years ago)
Another masterpiece from Zumthor.
Jan Vintr (4 years ago)
Stavbu tvoří relativně levné konstrukce a materiály, ale přesto jde ve výsledku o velmi moderní a čisté architektonické dílo. Vnitřní otevřený prostor dává dostatek volnosti vykopávkám a vůbec neruší jejich prohlídku. I ostatní stavby Petera Zumthora rozhodně stojí za návštěvu.
Hansu Lee (4 years ago)
이유를 모르겟지만 2019년 2월 5일 화요일 문이 닫혀있음
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