Chur Roman Ruins

Chur, Switzerland

Several prehistoric settlements and remains of a Roman road station have been discovered in Welschdörfli, the old town district in Chur. You can visit the excavations and discoveries on the Ackermann grounds on Seilerbahnweg.

The protective structures covering the archaeological sites from the Roman era were built in 1986 according to designs by local architect Peter Zumthor. They do not only protect the finds, they are also a museum and architectural masterpiece. The weighty building with its delicate rilled outer surface is reminiscent of the original Roman edifices.

You can get the key to the protective structures from the Chur Tourism information centre at the station.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 15 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Switzerland

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tim Stoop (3 years ago)
Great architecture with a nice exposition. You can get the entrance key at the chur tourism office at the station for a 50 EUR/chf deposit. Entrance itself costs 3 chf.
Kory Kerber (3 years ago)
Another masterpiece from Zumthor.
Jan Vintr (3 years ago)
Stavbu tvoří relativně levné konstrukce a materiály, ale přesto jde ve výsledku o velmi moderní a čisté architektonické dílo. Vnitřní otevřený prostor dává dostatek volnosti vykopávkám a vůbec neruší jejich prohlídku. I ostatní stavby Petera Zumthora rozhodně stojí za návštěvu.
Hansu Lee (3 years ago)
이유를 모르겟지만 2019년 2월 5일 화요일 문이 닫혀있음
Marco da Trindade (4 years ago)
Amazing work by Peter Zumthor to preserve the ruins
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Seaplane Harbour Museum

The Seaplane Harbour is the newest and one of the most exciting museums in Tallinn. It tells stories about the Estonian maritime and military history. The museum’s display, that comprises of more than a couple of hundred large exhibits, revitalizes the colourful history of Estonia.

British built submarine Lembit weighing 600 tones is the centrepiece of the new museum. Built in 1936 for the Estonian navy, Lembit served in the World War II under the Soviet flag. It remained in service for 75 years being the oldest submarine in the World still in use until it was hauled ashore in 2011. Despite its long history, Lembit is still in an excellent condition offering a glimpse of the 1930s art of technology.

Another exciting attraction is a full-scale replica of Short Type 184, a British pre-World War II seaplane, which was also used by the Estonian armed forces. Short Type 184 has earned its place in military history by being the first aircraft ever to attack an enemy’s ship with an air-launched torpedo. Since none of the original seaplanes have survived, the replica in Seaplane Harbour is the only full-size representation of the aircraft in the whole World.

Simulators mimicking a flight above Tallinn, around-the-world journey in the yellow submarine, navigating on the Tallinn bay make this museum heaven for kids or adventurous adults.

Seaplane Harbour operates in architecturally unique hangars built almost a century ago, in 1916 and 1917, as a part of Peter the Great sea fortress. These hangars are the World’s first reinforced concrete shell structures of such a great size. Charles Lindbergh, the man who performed the first solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean, landed here in 1930s.

On the outdoor area visitors can tour a collection of historic ships, including the Suur Tõll, Europe's largest steam-powered icebreaker.