Chur Roman Ruins

Chur, Switzerland

Several prehistoric settlements and remains of a Roman road station have been discovered in Welschdörfli, the old town district in Chur. You can visit the excavations and discoveries on the Ackermann grounds on Seilerbahnweg.

The protective structures covering the archaeological sites from the Roman era were built in 1986 according to designs by local architect Peter Zumthor. They do not only protect the finds, they are also a museum and architectural masterpiece. The weighty building with its delicate rilled outer surface is reminiscent of the original Roman edifices.

You can get the key to the protective structures from the Chur Tourism information centre at the station.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 15 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Switzerland

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tim Stoop (3 years ago)
Great architecture with a nice exposition. You can get the entrance key at the chur tourism office at the station for a 50 EUR/chf deposit. Entrance itself costs 3 chf.
Kory Kerber (3 years ago)
Another masterpiece from Zumthor.
Jan Vintr (3 years ago)
Stavbu tvoří relativně levné konstrukce a materiály, ale přesto jde ve výsledku o velmi moderní a čisté architektonické dílo. Vnitřní otevřený prostor dává dostatek volnosti vykopávkám a vůbec neruší jejich prohlídku. I ostatní stavby Petera Zumthora rozhodně stojí za návštěvu.
Hansu Lee (3 years ago)
이유를 모르겟지만 2019년 2월 5일 화요일 문이 닫혀있음
Marco da Trindade (4 years ago)
Amazing work by Peter Zumthor to preserve the ruins
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.