The walls which enclose the town of Moniga del Garda were built in the 10th century to face the Hungarian invasions. The castle was founded in the same period and is still in fairly good condition. Rectangular in shape (60 × 80), there is only one entrance at the centre of the eastern wall, where signs of an old drawbridge can still be seen. The crenulated city walls have four small round lookout towers on each corner. Three more towers are situated at the centre of the north, south and west walls. The square keep is now a bell tower.

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Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andreas Ruttig (16 months ago)
Nice Location
Marc Schiffelers (16 months ago)
Nice authentic place
Arne de Booij (17 months ago)
Amazing to see people still live inside this castle although there is not much to see.
Alan Olive (2 years ago)
Lovely castle walls and various houses neatly built inside, beautifully Italian
Vincentas Žiedas (2 years ago)
Outside of the walls there's a lovely natural teracce overlooking lake garda and the mountains. Inside them there's a very picturesque city with a couple of drinkable water fountains.
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