Biskops-Arnö

Bålsta, Sweden

Biskops-Arnö was a palatial residence of the archbishop of Uppsala, built in the first half of the 1300s. After the Reformation it was left to decay and finally demolished in the early 1700's, when the present main building was erected. For nearly 200 years Biskops-Arnö was a seat of Colonel in the Royal Regiment.

In 1956 Biskops-Arnö moved to the foundation of the Association of the Nordic Institute, who placed there a Nordic education institute and a college. Biskops-Arnö is a great destination that offers both nature and culture. Make sure to visit the Gothic hall, a room with limestone player and grand pillars - a remnant of the old bishop's castle. Visiting groups can book a meal or coffee at Biskops-Arnö college who also have hostel during the summer.

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Details

Founded: 1300s
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tore Danielsson (10 months ago)
A cultural experience with heritage and a very nice accommodation close to the folk high school. A special creative calm with the possibility of privacy.
Oscar Broman Vilen (2 years ago)
Nice place and so on nice staff, however don't go here as a teenager as the vast majority are over 45 with a few exceptions, also bring a lot of stuff to do as it often gets boring for a while
Erica Hellman (4 years ago)
Absolutely fantastic facility.
Ola Mattsson (5 years ago)
Great food, nice environment, nice meeting rooms and reasonable prices.
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