Casa de Pilatos

Seville, Spain

La Casa de Pilatos (Pilate's House) serves as the permanent residence of the Dukes of Medinaceli. It is an example of an Italian Renaissance building with Mudéjar elements and decorations. This beautiful mansion is one of central Seville’s hidden treasures, and its exquisite gardens, though smaller in scale, match anything you’ll see in the Alcázar.

The construction, which is adorned with precious azulejo tiles and well-kept gardens, was begun in 1483 by Pedro Enríquez de Quiñones, Adelantado Mayor of Andalucía, and his wife Catalina de Rivera, founder of the Casa de Alcalá, and completed by Pedro's son Fadrique Enríquez de Rivera, whose pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1519 led to the building being given the name 'Pilate's House'.

The palace’s undeniable good looks have earned it a starring role in two films: 1962’s Lawrence of Arabia and 2010’s Knight and Day.

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Details

Founded: 1483
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mayas Abo Naaj (7 months ago)
The building showcases a pleasant blend of architecture with a lot of elements and decorations. But for us was a bit disappointing the garden was normal considering the other gardens we have seen in Seville and the second floor was closed for the time we were there leaving little to explore and see. It didn't feel worth the time and money invested. I other places we were able to get students tickets but here there is no option for that. So my suggestion will be to make it your last station after visiting the other places.
Samad Golzari (8 months ago)
I liked here better than the Alcazar. Very peaceful and extremely beautiful gardens. We did not take the tour to the upper floor as we had to pay 5 euros more and also had to wait for the tour to start. But walking in the gardens and spaces alone was an extremely unbeatable experience. The only problem was their online ticket system. We had to buy the tickets on site, which was no problem at all. Highly recommended.
Dada ZD (8 months ago)
Few days ago I visited Casa Pilatos in Seville and was impressed by the stunning architecture of the palace. The intricate details and beautiful design elements made for a truly impressive sight. Very handy was audio guide that is included with ticket (€10) so I could easily go around and listen all about history and architecture of this amazing place in my own pace. Every room I explored was filled with history and beauty, from the grand staircase to the stunning gardens. Overall, I would highly recommend a visit to Casa Pilatos in Seville for anyone interested in architecture and history. It's a stunning palace with a rich history and a must-visit destination in Seville.
Dan Lu (8 months ago)
It is a nice building with typical Italian architecture with Mudejar elements and decorations. But what we didn't like it was that the garden and the second floor was closed and there were much to see. Not worthy the time and money.
Yann (10 months ago)
I recently visited Casa Pilatos in Seville and was impressed by the stunning architecture of the palace. The intricate details and beautiful design elements made for a truly impressive sight. Every room we explored was filled with history and beauty, from the grand staircase to the stunning gardens. It was clear that great care had been taken to preserve and maintain the palace over the years. The staff were also knowledgeable and helpful, providing information about the history of the palace and the significance of its design elements. Their passion for the palace was evident, and it added to the overall experience. Overall, I would highly recommend a visit to Casa Pilatos in Seville for anyone interested in architecture and history. It's a stunning palace with a rich history and a must-visit destination in Seville.
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