Casa de Pilatos

Seville, Spain

La Casa de Pilatos (Pilate's House) serves as the permanent residence of the Dukes of Medinaceli. It is an example of an Italian Renaissance building with Mudéjar elements and decorations. This beautiful mansion is one of central Seville’s hidden treasures, and its exquisite gardens, though smaller in scale, match anything you’ll see in the Alcázar.

The construction, which is adorned with precious azulejo tiles and well-kept gardens, was begun in 1483 by Pedro Enríquez de Quiñones, Adelantado Mayor of Andalucía, and his wife Catalina de Rivera, founder of the Casa de Alcalá, and completed by Pedro's son Fadrique Enríquez de Rivera, whose pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1519 led to the building being given the name 'Pilate's House'.

The palace’s undeniable good looks have earned it a starring role in two films: 1962’s Lawrence of Arabia and 2010’s Knight and Day.

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Details

Founded: 1483
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thor T (12 months ago)
Peaceful gardens, a few classical sculptures. No photography allowed upstairs which is unfortunate. I guess they want you to buy their books?
Charlie Webber (12 months ago)
Beautiful home centrally located. Worth a visit for the striking architecture alone. Advisable that you go before early morning as the light is pretty bright in late afternoon and it gets quite hot. 10EUR entry (+ 2EUR for guided tour upstairs) is a bit steep in comparison to other houses. The real let down was the staff not advising us that they were about to set up for an event despite us arriving around an hour before closing
Manna Rassi (13 months ago)
Awesome statues and architecture. There are gardens and the self guided tour was very thorough. I suggest getting the tickets for the upstairs as well, where you will get a tour guide and a better view of the building and it's surroundings.
Cristina Coșa (14 months ago)
Lovely building, considered the prototype of the Andalusian palace. It is a mix of the Italian Renaissance buildings with Mudéjar elements and decorations. We went to visit if on a Monday, and if you are coming from a EU country, after 15h00 on this particular day, the visit is free in the limit of 100 people per hour. I highly recommend you to visit it. It is a beautiful building with nice gardens.
Mark Powers (14 months ago)
Casa de Pilatos is an ancient pearl in Seville. The guide said that the land was confiscated from two Jewish men (presumably when the Jews in Spain were exiled). It was then transferred or sold to the ancestors of the current owners and the present building erected. Different parts of the great house are in various states of repair, and not all of the house contains furniture (some rooms are empty or closed to the public). Most of the house is open and interesting to see. Many paintings were acquired during the house's long history, with the small Goya perhaps the most interesting. Unfortunately the Goya is placed in a corner that is hard to get to, and hopefully a future rearrangement will improve access. The staff are friendly and the museum is only recently opened (about three years ago, this being July 2019), so hopefully things will get better with time. There are a number of busts of Roman emperors in the first floor, but not much else to see of Roman antiquities that a tourist booklet talked of. Why is the house called 'Casa de Pilatos'? Maybe because the land had been owned by Jews? The house itself is the main attraction. Note the tilework in the staircase! It is marvelous.
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