St. Nicholas' Church Ruins

Visby, Sweden

The church of St. Nicholas was originally part of the Dominican monastery built in the 1230s. It was destroyed by Lübeck army in 1525. The church has a beautiful rose window in the gable. In a summer season the St. Nicholas church ruins are a venue for musical “Petrus de Dacia”, who was the priory of monastery between 1283-1289.

References:
  • Marianne Mehling et al. Knaurs Kulturführer in Farbe. Schweden. München 1987.

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Details

Founded: 1230s
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cecil Lee (3 years ago)
Beautiful ruined church, that has been converted into a semi covered concert hall. Visiting during the day means a quick photostop, as there is not a huge amount to do, however if you can catch a concert I'm sure it's beautiful.
Raghu Ram Chitturi (4 years ago)
Good, a must visit site in Gotland
Ernest Adams (4 years ago)
Partially ruined medieval church, now in private hands and used for special events. Roofed over to stop rain and snow, but not heated. No toilets so far as I know. Closed if nothing is going on in it.
Ingrid McClure (4 years ago)
Attended an excellent fire show here during the Medieval Festival and this place was the perfect location for this venue!
Mathieu Maes (4 years ago)
Beautiful modern church. Great facilities and welcoming to all. Cushioned seats too! Why don't all churches have this?!
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