San Salvador de Lérez Monastery

Pontevedra, Spain

The Monastery of San Salvador or San Benito de Lérez was founded in the 10th century by Benedictine monks. The present church is Neo-Classical with an 18th-century Baroque façade, where the image of St. Benedict can be seen in a niche. Adjoining the southern wall, one wing of the 16th-century cloister is still standing. Some of the blocks in this wall show tomb engravings and Roman inscriptions, dating from the original construction.

The most interesting aspect of the interior is the Chapel of San Benito, built in the year 1700, and where we can see a beautiful image of the Saviour. It is a custom to pass below the Saint´s altar on one´s knees.

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Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismo.gal

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Javier Ibanez (3 years ago)
Es muy recomendable su visita
Roberto Baquero Pérez (3 years ago)
A place of peace and meditation. Both inside the church and in the views from its exterior.
Lil Ja (3 years ago)
Very pretty. Magnificent location.
Issamu Fukuda (3 years ago)
A beautiful landscape
Juan Lopez (4 years ago)
Ok
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