The Castello Normanno ('Norman Castle'), or alternatively the Castello di Aci, is situated on a rocky outcrop jutting out into the sea. Its precise date of construction is uncertain, but it was important to the development of its region during the Middle Ages. During the War of the Sicilian Vespers, it was subject to Roger of Lauria. It was besieged more than once, and was briefly controlled by the Spanish. It is currently a museum.

The town of Aci Castello developed around the castle, which was built in 1076 by the Normans upon the foundations of a 7th-century Byzantine fortification. In 1169, Aci Castello started to expand after an eruption of Mount Etna made the towns in its vicinity uninhabitable. The castle later became the property of the Bishops of Catania.

In 1296, Roger of Lauria, admiral of the Aragonese fleet during the War of the Sicilian Vespers, was granted the fief of Aci and its castle as a reward for his faithful service to King Frederick III of Sicily. When relations between the two men soured and di Lauria transferred his loyalties to the Angevins, the castle was besieged and captured by King Frederick and di Lauria stripped of his fiefs. In 1320, the castle and Aci were taken from Roger's descendant, Margaret of Lauria and given to Blasco II de Alagona. Whilst the latter was away defending Palermo from the attacking Angevins, Bertrando di Balzo sacked Aci in his absence.

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Founded: 1076
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Suu Aki (2 months ago)
The staff does not speak English, but they explained the location with gestures in Italian. Cheerful and very kind staff?
Daniel (2 months ago)
An ideal way to get out of the city centre for a while and enjoy the beautiful view of the sea and the coast. There is also a museum exhibition in the castle. This castle is a half-hour bus ride from the centre of Catania. The buses in Catania are the biggest problem because they don't run on time and certainly not according to the schedule on Google maps.
don Srilantha (6 months ago)
It was a nice place. I really enjoyed ?
dusty (9 months ago)
The poor old lady collecting money for the entry ticket is located at the top of a windy the staircase towards the foot of the castle yet many guests don't realize that they must pay cash and that she is unable to make change, disappointed after making this large assent. Therefore she should be able to accept credit cards on a mobile device which has become standard for the last 20 years of the century, and also proof that the money won't be pocketed but reported to the government. also a bit pricey at €3.50 for this 10 minute attraction, yet unique juxtaposition for this area
B DuB (12 months ago)
Nice scenery. Good place to relax and enjoy the breeze.
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