Latvian Museum of Pharmacy

Riga, Latvia

The Latvian Museum of Pharmacy is a medical museum in Riga, Latvia. It was founded in 1987 in association with the Pauls Stradins Museum for History of Medicine and is located in an18th century building which itself is an architectural monument. The museum is dedicated to understanding the development of pharmacy and pharmacies in Latvia and contains documents and books from the 17th-19th century, pharmacist tools and devices for preparing drugs, and drugs which were manufactured in Latvia in the 1920s and 1930s.

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Details

Founded: 1987
Category: Museums in Latvia
Historical period: Soviet Era (Latvia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rajan Gupta (2 years ago)
Amazing museum . Riga black balsam tasting , everything is worth the experience.
Cedric QianYi Sun (2 years ago)
Unique museum , for people who are in the medical field is a must see. It’s also a good historical museum. Ticket is very cheap and the place is nice and quiet, highly recommended.
Eslam Shalaby (2 years ago)
Beautiful and there are lovely people inside
Skyewz Osu (2 years ago)
A very nice museum
K J (2 years ago)
Very interesting museum. The building itself is dated as a residential house, which is an architecture monument of the 18th century. In the 19th century, carriage master Goblens lived here, but during Soviet times there were communal flats. The prices in this museum are not high, the stuff is extra nice! Pay attention to the front door-it`s amaizing!
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